AU Tigers Camp Builds Future Engineers

Published: Jul 19, 2007 11:34:29 AM
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Auburn University's Samuel Ginn College of Engineering hosted its fourth annual TIGERs Camp in July. More than sixty students attended the two camps - one for rising seventh and eighth grade students and the second for rising ninth and tenth grade students.

Teams and Individuals Guided by Engineering Resources (TIGERs) is a weeklong residential camp aimed at sparking students' interests in engineering and giving them a jumpstart on a career in the field.

Juwan Pulliam and Bonnie Wilson

Juwan Pulliam and Bonnie Wilson

"Our goal is to generate excitement about engineering by providing hands-on activities that capture the essence of the discipline," explains Bonnie Wilson, coordinator for the camp and recruiter for the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering. "It also allows us to showcase Auburn's highest ranked and largest engineering program."

Program activities for the camp include workshops, tours and lectures guided by practicing engineers and engineering students, and extracurricular activities, including a scavenger hunt, karaoke night and swimming in Auburn's Olympic-size pool.

Mallory George

Mallory George

"My sisters were in polymer engineering here at Auburn, so I've wanted to come here for a long time," says Mallory George of Gardendale, Ala. "I've had a lot of fun doing all the projects and experiments and I'm now thinking more about engineering."

Campers participated in numerous activities organized by each of Auburn's nine engineering departments, from recycling paper and creating slime to programming computers and building model cars.

Scott Neff - center

Scott Neff - center

Scott Neff, a freshman at Yorktown High School in Indiana, has decided he wants to be a mechanical engineer like his dad, an Auburn graduate. "I'm really into building and making stuff. Working on the ping-pong ball launcher and the solar event were my favorite parts of the camp so far."

TIGERs Camp is not just about classes and lectures. Many students leave with a new perspective on their futures. Juwan Pulliam from Fayetteville, Ga., had never thought much about a program like TIGERs camp until his brother, an incoming freshman for Fall 2007, came for Camp War Eagle.

"After visiting AU's College of Engineering and seeing what engineers actually do, I've really started thinking about becoming an engineer," says Pulliam. "I could definitely see myself as a civil engineer one day."